Weekly Recipes

Ollie’s Everyday Tomato Sauce for Pasta Recipe

Ollie’s Everyday Tomato Sauce for Pasta Recipe

This is my staple recipe and something that you can make as quickly as the pasta boils. I made it the other day with the ripe Marmande tomatoes in the hamper, though cherry tomatoes also work well. I use a mix of high quality tinned tomatoes for depth of flavour and fresh tomatoes, just cooked, to add freshness and vitality. No need for sweating onions, other vegetables or garlic. Just a lovely tomato taste accentuated with salt, sugar and vinegar, and enriched with olive oil. The olive oil balances the sweet-sour tomato taste and turns the sauce into something richer...

Read more →


Wild Garlic Broth

Wild Garlic Broth

A verdant and flavoursome wild garlic broth that is as versatile as it is easy to make. It can be served as a soup in its own right and would be delicious with some crumbled Latteria ricotta, toasted green asparagus and crushed hazelnuts. Or it can be served as a sauce for some roast sea bream or baked chicken thighs. If you want it thicker and more robust, you can add 100g of chopped new potatoes when you sweat the onion at the start. This recipe will make about a litre, but I always make it in bulk at home...

Read more →


Veal escalope a la créme

Veal escalope a la créme

Ollie’s a little tied up with a new baby, so we’ve written our favourite veal escalope recipe for you. We love our high welfare veal - and this is a classic french bistro dish, adapted from the fabulous Julia Child’s recipe from Mastering the Art of French Cooking Vol.1. Dry the escalopes thoroughly on paper towels and salt them. Place half the butter and tablespoon of oil in a heavy based frying pan over a medium heat. When the foam from the butter subsides, add the veal. Cook on both sides until almost done. Remove and reserve. Stir in the...

Read more →


New Potato 101

New Potato 101

A few cooking options here, all of which are very simple and all of which share the same principle: cook long and slowly. This showcases their silken waxy texture far better than a fast boil, which can break up the cells, leading to an inferior less indulgent mouthfeel. How you should cook your new potatoes depends on what you are serving them with. If you want them as a simple accompaniment, then just simmer gently in salted water. Always start them off in a pan of cold water, never hot from the kettle, which would result in the outside cooking...

Read more →

Le Marché des Chefs Hampers
Recent Articles